communication Archives | MGH Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds

Articles containing: communication

My Child Was Diagnosed With Anxiety or Depression. How Should I Talk to Her About It?

“Should I use the word anxious or depressed?”  

“Should I talk about it at all with my daughter?”  

“What should I say to my teenage son?”  

“How can I even bring it up?”  

These are just a few of the questions parents ask when their child is given a diagnosis of anxiety or depression.

Desarrollar el bienestar mental en los niños: lo que los padres pueden hacer

Los padres son los verdaderos expertos cuando se trata de conocer a sus hijos, y a menudo son los primeros en notar cualquier cambio en el comportamiento de sus hijos:

Colin era un joven feliz. Tenía amigos, le iba bien en la escuela y se llevaba bien con sus hermanos y padres en casa.

When Young People Lose a Hero to a Tragic Death

Most of us, young and old, were stunned by the tragic death of Kobe Bryant along with his daughter. Whether you are a Laker’s fan or not, Kobe represented something more, including for young people.  

Tom Brady said it this way in a Twitter statement:  

“And in this tragedy, I have learned so much.

Is Your Teen an Emotional Sponge? – Shrinking It Down

Peers can be an excellent source of social support, and it’s great that more young people today talk to friends about their emotional challenges. But for every teen who shares, there’s another teen absorbing the info like an emotional sponge.

The Trauma of Teenage Breakups

When you’re 17 years old, breaking up with someone really, really hurts.

Yeah, that’s a cliché. So much so that almost every adult can think of a favorite popular culture reference to this particular kind of pain. My personal favorite occurs at the heartbreaking beginning of Nick Hornby’s novel, High Fidelity.

Being an Emotional Sponge: Supporting Young People Who Are Supporting Friends

Mental health problems among young people are on the rise. Recent studies show that depression, anxiety, suicide and loneliness are escalating, and that Generation Z is struggling now more than ever before.

The good news is that more young people are openly talking about emotional and behavioral challenges.

A Clay Center Top 10 – Blog Year in Review

Looking forward in 2020, we couldn’t help but look back at our most popular blog posts during 2019. Like everyone, we want to thrive in the year ahead. Learning what’s been of most interest and use to the parents and caregivers we serve helps us to decide on what new original content will best support families, nationwide and beyond.

Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT): A Closer Look

Listen to our podcast episode on Cognitive Behavior Therapy, featuring Susan Sprich, PhD. 

 Jenny was a 15-year-old high school sophomore who had suffered from depression for six months. Her pediatrician referred her to a psychiatrist, who prescribed Prozac for her depressive symptoms.

What Is Family Therapy?

Family therapy emphasizes the idea that a child lives and grows in relationship to others, particularly in relationship to members of his or her own family. There are many different family therapy approaches.

Why Chores Are Important for Kids

Chores.

We all remember them.

Some were associated with allowance, others simply mandatory. For many kids, and I bet for most of us, they were often an intrusion on other more important things to do.