Pre-School

When You Have An Explosive Child

This blog post is part of a series entitled Real Lives, Real Stories: Personal Experiences With Mental Illness.

Muslim Children: Addressing Prejudice and Xenophobia

April 12, 2016

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As an adult Muslim, I find it disconcerting, and at times, downright frightening, to hear xenophobic statements about keeping Muslims out of the country. In my work as a child psychiatrist, I’m hearing from Muslim parents across the country that their children are coming home to them with difficult questions and intense emotional reactions.

Talking To Children About A Sibling’s Mental Illness – 8 Tips for Parents

April 7, 2016

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It seemed like just another Wednesday evening. After the routine disagreements and struggles over homework, everyone sat down together to eat dinner and talk about their day. Afterwards, the twins (a boy and girl, age 9) settled in for a game of Uno while their 14-year-old sister went upstairs to finish her homework.

Are Increased Academic Demands Causing ADHD?

March 29, 2016

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The rates of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have increased considerably in the last 40 years. In fact, in the United States, the prevalence of ADHD has doubled since the 1970s. A number of experts have weighed in on why these numbers may have increased.

Helping Your Kids Following Yet Another Terrorist Attack

In light of today’s attack in Brussels, Belgium, we are re-posting this blog we wrote last November (just five months ago) in response to the tragedy that befell Paris. Our hearts go out to the families of those who lost their lives in this most recent nonsensical act of violence.

What Are Some Of The Major Theories Of Development?

When child development experts talk about the study of development, they have in mind some fundamental theories of development that were codified by brilliant clinicians and scientists well before we had the technology to correlate them to brain development.

In this post, we’ll pay homage to these theorists.

What Is An Individualized Education Program (IEP)?

February 23, 2016

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Billy was a second grader who was having difficulty reading. He was thus evaluated through his public school system to see if he was eligible to receive special education services. Upon his completion of a series of tests, Billy was identified as having a reading disability; this diagnosis entitled him to special education services.

Discovering Who I Am: The Critical Role Of Identity

October 19, 2015

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The Caterpillar and Alice looked at each other for some time in silence: at last the Caterpillar took the hookah out of its mouth, and addressed her in a languid, sleepy voice.

“Who are you?” said the Caterpillar.

This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation.

What Are Intelligence Tests?

March 13, 2015

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Probably no other single area of evaluation has seen more controversy than that of intelligence. Psychologists have debated whether intelligence is learned or inherited, culturally-specific or universal, one ability or several. These debates are ongoing, and won’t soon be resolved.

The Plight Of Homeless Children In The United States

This is the first blog post of a series in collaboration with the Lesley University Child Homelessness Initiative (CHI). For more information about the CHI curriculum, and the ways in which it seeks to empower the next generation of teachers and caregivers to understand and advocate for homeless children, visit their website.